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Dustin LindenSmith

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The venerable Lin Chi, a.k.a. Rinzai, died 867 CE

This excerpt reminds me of my "no-should" philosophy, the one in which I advocate doing away with the concept of should, with the idea that we "have to" become this, change that, improve ourselves, and the like. Whatever is happening, is happening for a reason. Just leave it alone and find your true, natural response to it and you'll be fine.
Lin Chi's teachings encourage people to have faith that their natural spontaneous functioning is the true Buddha-Mind. In this pure state of being, one does not obstruct, block, withhold, or repress anything. In this state of being, freedom from attachment does not mean to be without feeling, but rather it means: entering into all activities with your whole heart, not holding anything back, being at one with any situation. This is the enlightened way to live an ordinary life. When Lin Chi's students told him they were searching for deliverance from this world he would ask them: if they were delivered from the world, where could they go? He advised his student to live simply and wholeheartedly, without blind, enslaving desire:
When it's time to get dressed, put on your clothes. When you must walk, then walk. When you must sit, then sit. Just be your ordinary self in ordinary life, unconcerned in seeking for Buddhahood. When you're tired, lie down. The fool will laugh at you but the wise man will understand.
source: http://sped2work.tripod.com/linchi.html (via Nondual Highlights Issue #2408)

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millennialhippy March 3rd, 2006
I really like that principle.. it's definitely a very centered way of living. But how do you balance things like "life planning" into it. Once you set a goal, a whole bunch of SHOULDs rain down on you. Is it just a matter of addressing those 'shoulds' once and not belaboring them?

iamom March 3rd, 2006
Is it just a matter of addressing those 'shoulds' once and not belaboring them?

Yeah, I think that's exactly how it should work. There's a natural set of shoulds that arise "as they should" from the natural obligations of our lives. But most of us go far beyond that natural set of shoulds to create a whole network of additional obligations that we can't help but fail to live up to. And then as soon as we've failed at a few of those extra ones, we start to feel bad about ourselves, thereby lowering our self-confidence and leading to more emotional issues.

In my opinion, anyway! :)

baal_kriah March 3rd, 2006
I advocate doing away with the concept of should, with the idea that we "have to" become this, change that, improve ourselves, and the like. Whatever is happening, is happening for a reason. Just leave it alone and find your true, natural response to it and you'll be fine.

I'm down with Lin Chi, but frankly your formulation above sounds suspiciously like a "should" to me :-)

vyus March 4th, 2006
I like that. I think of shoulds as an expression of the inner critic.

Thinking about doing isn't doing. Or so the forest tells me.

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